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Researchers have discovered a gene that can protect elephants from cancer. An estimated 17 percent of humans worldwide die from cancer, but less than five percent of captive elephants—who live for about 70 years, and have about 100 times as...
MIAMI - A new study found that a nutrient-rich, balanced diet is beneficial to corals during stressful thermal events. The research led by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and the...
A team of Chinese scientists announced on Jan. 13 that they have developed a new bright VUV FEL light source, the Dalian Coherent Light Source (DCLS), which can deliver world's brightest FEL light in an energy range from 8...
Birds living in urban environments are smarter than birds from rural environments. But, why do city birds have the edge over their country friends? They adapted to their urban environments enabling them to exploit new resources more favorably then their...
  Neuroscientists have discovered how the brain learns physical tasks, even in the absence of real-world movement. It could hinge on getting the mind to the right starting place and to be ready to perfectly execute everything that follows with a...
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- In the summer of 2012, Olga Kotelko, a 93-year-old Canadian track-and-field athlete with more than 30 world records in her age group, visited the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois...
Astronomers have discovered 11 new stellar streams—remnants of smaller galaxies torn apart and devoured by our Milky Way. The finding is among the highlights of the first three years of survey data from the Dark Energy Survey—research on about 400...
If you have to negotiate business with a narcissist or psychopath, you're better off doing it on Facebook, research from UBC's Okanagan campus shows. In one of the first studies of its kind, UBC researchers found that traditionally successful manipulators...
Although sleepy people had trouble interpreting happiness and sadness in a recent study, they had no problem doing so with other emotions—anger, fear, surprise, and disgust. That’s likely because we’re wired to recognize those more primitive emotions in order to...
Parents' estimations of their children's happiness differ significantly from the child's own assessment of their feelings, a study has shown. Research by psychologists at Plymouth University showed parents of 10 and 11-year-olds consistently overestimated their child's happiness, while those with...